Montevideo Elementary School

2017 Total Solar Eclipse

2017 Total Solar Eclipse
Science and simple explanations

How to view Eclipse without Solar Glasses!

Build a solar eclipse indirect viewer either with a cereal box, or with two 3x5 cards (One with a hole, another as a screen).

Cereal box viewer:

You need a cereal box, aluminum foil, a nail, tape and scissors. 

Cut bottom of box leaving middle intact - one side will allow light in, the other will be the viewing window.

 

Cut a piece of aluminum foil to cover one of the openings, tape it and poke a hole with a nail.


SAFE VIEWING IF YOU DON'T HAVE ECLIPSE SOLAR GLASSES! 

 

Today: 1/22/18

News from Our Science Lab

Welcome to our Science Program Page!

Great beginnings in science this year, because of the Total Solar Eclipse!  

 

By now, your children might have come home sharing what they have learned about eclipses at school. 

 

Why all the excitement around this phenomenon?

Even though there are more total solar eclipses happening on our planet, take a look at the following map of how many eclipses (Total and Partial) have taken place in the past 17 years!


 

Most total eclipses happened over non-populated areas!  The alignment of the sun, moon and Earth at just the right angle, and time for a total solar eclipse will take another 7 years to happen over the U.S. And if you miss this one or the next, here is a map of how many there will be in this Century over the U.S.!


 

 

Our students are going to have an amazing opportunity to witness the view from San Ramon, (a partial eclipse of about 75% coverage) in connection with this rare total eclipse phenomenon taking place across the U.S.A. 

 

Our school has purchased solar viewing glasses from the Rainbow Symphony company, which is one of the approved vendors.

So, your children and all our staff will experience the total solar eclipse from our view point in San Ramon!

 

Most importantly, we are emphasizing NEVER TO LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN without proper eye solar glasses' protection!

 

If you would like to learn more about the Eclipse, you may download an informational flyer from NASA at: 

https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/2017EclipseAcrossAmericaFlyer_508.pdf